GOLDEN HEAVY BODY ACRYLIC 59 ML SR 7 INTERFERENCE BLUE FINE 4030-2

SKU: A00003405
GOLDEN HEAVY BODY ACRYLIC 59 ML SR 7 INTERFERENCE BLUE FINE 4030-2

GOLDEN HEAVY BODY ACRYLIC 59 ML SR 7 INTERFERENCE BLUE FINE 4030-2

SKU: A00003405
Regular price Rs. 1,870.00 Sale price Rs. 1,683.00 Save Rs. 187
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Golden Interference Artist Acrylics offer a unique “flip” when viewed from different angles. The colors flip between a bright opalescent color and its complement. Over white or lighter surfaces, the color is more subtle and the “flip” effect is more obvious. Over black or darker surfaces the color is more obvious and the “flip” effect is less dramatic. Adding a very small amount of black to Interference Colors produces deeper opalescent effects. Combine with Golden Gels (Gloss) and Fluid Acrylic Colors to create an endless variety of colors and effects. Golden produces 6 Interference Colors in Coarse and Fine sizes. The fine particles produce a more even sheen, while the coarse particles add more sparkle, especially on uneven surfaces. Golden Interference Artist Acrylics achieve their reflective properties by synthetically reproducing several natural phenomena-the nacreous, or pearlescent, qualities found in fish scales or the dust of a butterfly's wing, and the shiny and reflective qualities found in certain metals and minerals. "Coarse" Iridescent and Interference Colors are simply larger particle size versions of our "Fine" Iridescent and Interference products. Coarse colors in the Iridescent line include Copper, Copper Light, Gold and Pearl. The Coarse Interference Colors are Blue, Gold, Green and Red. The property at work in the Interference Colors is known as light interference, most commonly seen in the rainbow effect created by a thin layer of oil on the surface of water. Thomas Young identified this phenomenon in 1801 in a series of investigations that were eventually instrumental in advancing the theory for the wave-like nature of light. Whenever light strikes a boundary between two materials of different densities, the light will either be reflected or refracted. If the refracted light encounters yet another boundary between materials of different densities, this light will again either be reflected or refracted. This process continues every time a new phase is encountered. You might also like:

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